Rebounder for Lymphatic Drainage

Rebounder for Lymphatic Drainage
by Jennifer Elliot | January 21, 2013

Jump around for lymphatic drainage

Every day we’re increasingly exposed to toxins, pollutants and harmful chemicals that – in combination with an increased susceptibility to preventable diseases – are leading to a rise in chronic illnesses. Apart from taking active steps to reduce our exposure to toxins, chemicals and pollutants, we can also routinely cleanse the internal systems of our bodies to flush out the harmful substances that infiltrate our bodies. By cleansing the blood, internal organs, and tissues you can eliminate the risk of accumulated toxins within the body, and reduce the probability of suffering from debilitating and critical diseases. One of the methods for internal cleansing is lymphatic drainage.

Why is lymphatic drainage so important?

The lymphatic system is composed of numerous veins and capillaries that contain a clear fluid called lymph. One of the critical jobs of the lymphatic system is to carry waste and other harmful substances away from cells, tissues and blood supply and transport it to the organs that can flush out these substances from the body.

Lymphatic drainage is essential to keep the lymphatic system working efficiently and smoothly. The lymphatic system also contains lymph nodes, which essentially act as filters that the lymph passes through. Lymph nodes play a very instrumental role in this process: they contain white blood cells that attack and destroy foreign substances that can cause damage to the body. What role do rebounder exercises for lymphatic drainage have to play in all of this? Unlike the blood circulatory system – which relies on the heart muscle to pump blood around the body – the lymphatic system relies simply on exercise and bodily motion to trigger the flow of the lymph fluid through the lymphatic system.

Without exercise to promote lymphatic drainage, the lymph fluid becomes thick, slow moving and concentrated with harmful substances and waste materials. The lymph nodes also become clogged with waste materials, debris and foreign particles and are unable to carry out their protective roles efficiently and effectively. All these negative effects are primarily due to a lack of bodily movement that renders the lymphatic system lethargic and full of harmful substances that increase the risks of suffering from critical illness and disease.

Trampoline for a healthy lymphatic system

Jumping on a trampoline not only promises a great deal of fun – it also guarantees effective lymphatic drainage action. Trampolines are one of the best lymphatic drainage exercises. The forceful, energetic and rapid action of rebounding on a trampoline can flush out the lymphatic system in a matter of two minutes; triple the number of white blood cells in the lymph nodes and keep their numbers elevated for at least an hour; activate the immune system; strengthen all the cells of the body; and drastically improve the lymphatic system’s protective functions within the body.

The most effective way to use rebounder exercises therapeutically is to have a two-minute rebound session every waking hour to keep the lymphatic system working in top form. You might be tempted to engage in a one hour long rigorous session of rebounding exercises, but each two-minute session will work just as well to sustain the elevated white blood cell count and flush out toxins. According to Linda Brooks, author of Rebounding to Better Health, rebounding can also diminish cancerous tumors. Those who are too weak to perform rebounder exercises can support themselves with a stabilizer bar and engage in mild, gentle bouncing sessions.

About the Author - Jennifer Elliot

Jennifer Elliot takes her Nutrition (and yours) very seriously! She believes that the strongest weapon we have against all diseases, ailments and conditions is Nutrition. She also widely promotes the importance of exercise to maintain optimal health. Keep an eye out for Jennifer’s articles to remain updated on how to lead a nutritious life!

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